• Lube Oil Analysis Options
    MRG’s experts have been performing in-depth oil analysis for over 25 years. Our Lube Oil Analysis monitors the health of oil-lubricated equipment with a comprehensive testing slate. Oils are assessed in three categories: Wear, Oxidation and Physical Properties.
    While our Standard Oil Analysis Slate provides comprehensive oil health analysis, some customers require additional testing. If you require additional testing beyond the standard slate, please contact us.
  • Standard Oil Analysis Slate
    Select a topic to learn more:
    Particle Count
    Particle Count
    Purpose
    Particle counting quantifies the particles in an oil that are larger than 4, 6, and 14 microns. These quantities are translated into the ISO rating. Particle levels are a key indicator of oil health
    Method
    Oil is pumped through an optical chamber while a light is shown on the sample. Particles are quantified by the scattering of the light as it passes through the sample.
    DR-III Ferrography
    DR-III Ferrography
    Purpose
    DR-III Ferrography is used to determine wear levels in oil. Measurements are made at two sizes in order to determine the severity of the ferrous debris. High levels of large particles may indicate analytical ferrography is necessary.
    Method
    DR-III Ferrography is an optical technique in which ferrous debris is separated from the oil by a magnetic field. As the ferrous debris is captured by the magnetic field, it interrupts a light source that is being measured by a sensor. The decrease in light transmitted through the sample corresponds to the quantity of ferrous debris present in the sample.
    RDE Spectroscopy
    RDE Spectroscopy
    Purpose
    Rotating Disc Electrode (RDE) Spectroscopy is an atomic emission spectroscopy method that quantifies the elements that are present in the lubricant. These elements include wear metals such as iron, copper and zinc, additive elements such as magnesium and phosphorus, and grease thickeners such as calcium and sodium. RDE spectroscopy therefore can be used to evaluate wear and contamination properties of a sample.
    Method
    In this atomic emission spectroscopic method, a small portion of the dissolved sample is ignited between two carbon electrodes. The various wavelength of light that are emitted by the sample as it burns are measured. The various wavelengths that are present and their relative intensity are used to quantify the individual elements that are present in the sample.
    Viscosity
    Kinematic Viscosity
    Purpose
    Viscosity is one of the most important aspects of oil lubrication. Kinematic Viscosity measurements ensure that the viscosity of the oil is within the normal range.
    Method
    Oil is placed in a u-tube with capillary and inserted into a constant temperature bath to ensure temperature remains at 40oC. The time required for the oil to pass through the capillary is measured. This time is converted into the viscosity using the viscosity constant of the u-tube and reported in centiStokes.
    FT-IR Spectroscopy
    FT-IR Spectroscopy
    Purpose
    Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) is used to determine the chemical properties of a compound in a qualitative manner. Oxidation products can be detected using this spectroscopic technique. Contamination, including mixing with incompatible greases is easily detected using this method.
    Method
    A small quantity of grease is subjected to the spectrum of infrared radiation. Specific wavelengths of infrared radiation excite the chemical bonds that make up the grease and generate a unique spectral fingerprint for each grease. This fingerprint can be compared to baseline data to determine chemical changes in grease composition.
    Karl Fisher Moisture Analysis
    Karl Fischer Water Titration
    Purpose
    Karl Fischer Titration is used to determine the concentration of water in a lubricant. It is used to assess environmental contamination.
    Method
    The lubricant sample is heated in a gas-proof oven in order to vaporize water any water present in the sample. Water vapor is then carried by an inert gas to the reaction chamber, where water vapor reacts with iodine in solution and generates an electric current. The magnitude of the current that is generate corresponds to the concentration of water present in the sample, which is reported in parts per million (ppm).
    RULER Testing
    RULER Testing
    Purpose
    Remaining Useful Life (RULER) testing measures the percent of anti-oxidant additive package that remains in the lubricant compared to the baseline. This test shows show if the lubricant is at elevated risk for oxidation.
    Method
    A portion of the lubricant is exposed to a solvent that extracts anti-oxidants from the lubricant. This extract is subjected to linear sweep voltammetry which measures the change in current as a conducting compound, such as an anti-oxidant, is subjected to linearly increasing potential. The current response of the sample is compared to a baseline to determine the percent of anti-oxidant protection that remains.
    Extra Service Offerings
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    Analytical Ferrography
    Analytical Ferrography
    Purpose
    Analytical ferrography involves the examination of ferrous debris from a lubricant sample by a qualified laboratory analyst. The analyst may determine wear modes that generated wear specific particles and diagnose abnormal component conditions based on this analysis.
    Method
    The lubricant is dissolved in organic solvent. It then slowly flows over a microscope slide that is subjected to magnetic field. Ferrous particles are trapped on the slide while non-ferrous particles wash away. These ferrous particles are then examined under high magnification by a laboratory analyst in order to assess generative wear modes.
    Oil Filter Testing
    Varnish Potential
    Base Number
    Acid Number
    PURCHASE ANALYSIS PACKAGE